Street Style Wales

Knitting, stitching, thrifting, crocheting


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Strawberry Thief Liberty Emery dress

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I haven’t done any sewing for a few weeks now, what with being in London for work and all, but I did make this beautiful (if I do say so myself) dress before I went. I don’t really know what to say about this dress, except that it’s another Emery pattern, in a Liberty Strawberry Thief print. I really love my Liberty print!

Despite making quite a few of these dresses now, this Emery still turned out differently, even though I followed the same instructions. I’m not sure whether I was a little bit tighter with the seam allowances but this one was bigger in the waist and bodice than any of my previous attempts. Hmmmm.

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I’m also a massive fan of the length of the Emery dress, but the last one was just a little bit too long. So I shortened this one quite a bit and now the length is perfect for me.

I loved working with the Strawberry Thief fabric and I loved that it had quite a straight print as it made me really take notice of how I cut it and of making each part match up. I’m really pleased with how it turned out.

The only thing that’s slightly annoying me is that I made a facing for the neckline. Although I love facings generally, this one seems a bit bulky in the front and needs pressing down. My initial plan for this dress was to make matching bias binding for the neckline and arms, but I cut out the facing before remembering my plan and didn’t really want the beautiful fabric to go to waste. I think, in the future, I may take it out and try the bias binding option.

Like the other Liberty fabric, this one too is very thin but I’m sure I’ll get a lot of wear out of this dress. Plus, it’s Strawberry Thief! Who doesn’t like birds picking fruit from a tree on their clothes?

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A dress that Pinterest inspired



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If you follow me on Instagram, you may remember I posted about a quirky rabbit print fabric a while ago that I didn’t know what to do with.

The pin that started it all

The pin that started it all

After scouring my DIYs and Crafts Pinterest board, I remembered a tutorial I’d pinned ages ago for a V neck dress. The tutorial was for a maxi dress, but I don’t wear maxi dresses that often, so I shortened it quite easily. The whole tutorial was pretty self-explanatory and called for four rectangular pieces of fabric according to your measurements. Sounds easy, right?

I did have to make some adjustments, mainly to the arms and top, as otherwise the dress would have swamped me (it still needs a belt to give it some shape otherwise it kind of looks like a tent). I brought the arms in a bit, so the dress would have less of a cap sleeve look and brought the top in quite a bit too, but all in all, I really love this dress. It’s so versatile and has a nice drape thanks to the viscose fabric. I also love the V neck shape. And best of all, I can slip it over my head so no need for a pesky zip. Yay!

Anyone else use Pinterest tutorials for ideas? I’d love some more inspiration!

Also, sidenote: the belt was given to me by my Dad who wore it as a 13 year old!!

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Roses are… purple

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This Emery kind of reminds me of a 50s dress. I know that’s the look the Emery is going for anyway, but the fabric is very 50s inspired and seems to suit the pattern well. I initially picked it up as I loved the purple roses on a white background and thought it would make a great summery dress. There are also touches of green around the roses too, which I love.

The great thing about this fabric is that it is great for hiding a few errors. I need to redo the neckline at some point and hem it (I hate hemming!), but I may keep this version longer than the other Emeries I’ve made. What do you think?

I didn’t really love working with this fabric but I think that is because I used Liberty tana lawn for the previous Emery I made and that’s a dream to work with.

This one will probably stay in my ‘to finish’ pile for a little while while I work my way through the other sewing projects I have to do and I’ll hem it on a rainy afternoon sometime.
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A blue floral Emery dress

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I feel like my sewing style is very samey at the moment, but to be perfectly honest, I’m enjoying making fit and flare dresses and tops, as that is what I wear most of the time anyway. Therefore it makes sense to me to add them to my wardrobe. There are definitely more Emeries to come soon too. However, that’s not to say that there isn’t anything different in the making either. I’m currently planning a Francoise and another pair of trousers soon. And that’s after the next few dresses I have to post about.

This Emery is the wearable toile I made in preparation for my friend’s wedding and the first Emery I ever made (I’ve made three more since then). I used the same fabric as one of my peplum tops: a really lovely fabric from Ebay with a slight stretch.

I’ve mentioned my love for the Emery before, but I just find this style so easy to wear and it’s really classic. I have actually passed this version on to my Mum as she loved the fabric more than I did and loves wearing bright colours. So yep, more Emeries to come. Please stick with me for a while.


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Wednesday wishlist: Summer prints from Seasalt

It’s been a while since I did one of these, hasn’t it? Not to worry though. This week I’ve been on a hunt for summer clothes and I found myself on the Seasalt website, thanks to longtime fave dressmaker Isabel Knowles. Seasalt is a brand local to Cornwall and was started in Penzance, where there’s still a shop, in 1981. Many of the Seasalt garments are certified organic by the Soil Association and there is even a range of locally made products too. I love discovering brands that really care about the ethos of their company and I’m sure that I’ll be buying a lot from Seasalt in the future.

Trenython jumper, £55, Seasalt

Trenython jumper, £55, Seasalt

Starting with the Trenython jumper, at £55 this one is a little pricey for any old top but has the cutest little boat print on it. Who doesn’t love boats on their clothes? Not me, that’s for sure. This one is perfect for covering up after a day at the beach or for those chillier evening walks. Channelling the Cornish coast, this top will be making its way to my basket shortly.

Rosina dress, £65, Seasalt

Rosina dress, £65, Seasalt

Stripes ahoy for my next pick, the Rosina dress. I’m reminded a little of Cath Kidston, in both colour and style, with this dress and I love the strong print too. Plus, stripes are my staple pattern of choice at the moment. I can imagine wearing this dress to all those summer parties I’ll be invited to (yeah right!).

Lookout crops, £55, Seasalt

Lookout crops, £55, Seasalt

Lastly, these Lookout crops come in two colours, but this vibrant floral print is the best by far. Team with a white tee for the ultimate outfit to relax by the beach in. Add in a pair of white converse, and the trousers will give a pop of colour to any outfit.

Have you ever bought anything from Seasalt before? Are you a fan of their ethos? I’ll definitely be buying from the brand soon.


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Do you know who made your clothes?

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Today is Fashion Revolution Day, a momentous day in the sustainable fashion world. It marks two years since the Rana Plaza factory disaster in Bangladesh, where 1133 people died and a further 2500 people were injured while working for well-known fashion brands, brands that we buy into here in the UK.

The day was set up in response to the Rana Plaza catastrophe in 2013 by co-founders Carry Somers and Orsola de Castro, in an effort to raise awareness of the incident that happened in 2013 and to call for a systematic reform of the fashion chain.

The initiative is gathering huge momentous on social media where organisers are encouraging people to post photos of themselves wearing their clothes inside out with the hashtag #fashrev and asking the question, ‘Who made your clothes?’. The main aim of Fashion Revolution Day, however, is to stop the UK buyers forgetting about the incident and organisers hope instead to create change in the fashion industry.

The organisers say, “In short we believe that 1133 is too many people to lose from the planet in one factory, on one terrible day, without standing for something.”

They continue, “We need it [the day] to show the world that change is possible.”

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So, do you know who made your clothes? I’m guilty of buying from high street shops without a care for how the clothes were made or who made them, but isn’t it time we took a stand and started caring about the conditions of the workers who make our clothes?

At the very least, that is what I love about making my own clothes. I know exactly where my clothes have been made and who made them, although I know less about the fabrics used to make them. There are so many positives to making your own clothes, not least for the above.

But, for today, I will be asking ‘Who made my clothes?’. If you’d like to get involved too, the Fashion Revolution website is here, or show your support via the organisation’s Instagram or Twitter.

 

Photos courtesy of www.fashionrevolution.org


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Wednesday wishlist: Crazy for Cath

I was lucky enough to be invited to the Cath Kidston SS15 press event just before Christmas and, of course, I happily went along. For a long time Cath Kidston has been a brand that I’ve loved and I have many a staple piece from past collections that I love. So it seems fitting that this week’s Wednesday wishlist celebrates my love for the brand.

This cloud print is everywhere lately and seems to be the signature style for Cath Kidston this season. When I went to the press event there was even a cloud print bike outside, welcoming us all inside. The shape on this dress is really flattering and would make anybody wearing it break into a smile I think. It’s not really a dress for wearing when feeling under the weather (no pun intended, honestly), is it? Although, what better excuse is there to buy it to cheer ourselves up during these gloomy, waiting-for-spring days?

Clouds cotton dress, £60, Cath Kidston

Clouds cotton dress, £60, Cath Kidston

I love everything about this next dress. The floral pattern, the red trim, the ric rac and the cute sleeves. Again, it seems that ric rac is a big part of the spring/summer collection and I can see why. It rings back to beautiful childhood dresses and adds a special something to outfits. I also adore the colours and can see myself wearing this constantly in the summer, with a pair of white socks and brogues.

Paradise bunch button front dress, £90, Cath Kidston

Paradise bunch button front dress, £90, Cath Kidston

Look at this beauty of a skirt! Isn’t it lovely? I remember seeing this at the event and making a mental note to purchase it when it came out. Again, this skirt keeps up with the ric rac theme and is basically made up of the colourful trim. At £85, it’s a little bit pricier than other skirts on the website, but as is the case with Cath Kidston clothes, I’m sure it’s long lasting and it’ll go with most things in your wardrobe, as there are just so many colours there! So price aside, it’s guaranteed to be a good buy.

Ric rac hem cotton skirt, £85, Cath Kidston

Ric rac hem cotton skirt, £85, Cath Kidston

All images courtesy of Cath Kidston. To be taken to all Wednesday wishlist posts, click here.