Street Style Wales

Knitting, stitching, thrifting, crocheting


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Do you know who made your clothes?

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Today is Fashion Revolution Day, a momentous day in the sustainable fashion world. It marks two years since the Rana Plaza factory disaster in Bangladesh, where 1133 people died and a further 2500 people were injured while working for well-known fashion brands, brands that we buy into here in the UK.

The day was set up in response to the Rana Plaza catastrophe in 2013 by co-founders Carry Somers and Orsola de Castro, in an effort to raise awareness of the incident that happened in 2013 and to call for a systematic reform of the fashion chain.

The initiative is gathering huge momentous on social media where organisers are encouraging people to post photos of themselves wearing their clothes inside out with the hashtag #fashrev and asking the question, ‘Who made your clothes?’. The main aim of Fashion Revolution Day, however, is to stop the UK buyers forgetting about the incident and organisers hope instead to create change in the fashion industry.

The organisers say, “In short we believe that 1133 is too many people to lose from the planet in one factory, on one terrible day, without standing for something.”

They continue, “We need it [the day] to show the world that change is possible.”

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So, do you know who made your clothes? I’m guilty of buying from high street shops without a care for how the clothes were made or who made them, but isn’t it time we took a stand and started caring about the conditions of the workers who make our clothes?

At the very least, that is what I love about making my own clothes. I know exactly where my clothes have been made and who made them, although I know less about the fabrics used to make them. There are so many positives to making your own clothes, not least for the above.

But, for today, I will be asking ‘Who made my clothes?’. If you’d like to get involved too, the Fashion Revolution website is here, or show your support via the organisation’s Instagram or Twitter.

 

Photos courtesy of www.fashionrevolution.org

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An (unhemmed) Marthe top


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I’ve had this Republique du Chiffon Marthe top made up for a while now, but it has stayed unhemmed and unfinished (and unironed too – sorry about that. I have a broken iron at the moment and don’t want to risk using my straighteners on it).

I obsessed about this pattern when I first saw it (on Stitch and Cappuccino) and literally salivated over the different versions I found on Pinterest, here, here, here and here. I love, love, love this pattern and couldn’t wait to try it myself so I bought some floral fabric from Ebay and set to it. However, in the making up of this garment, many things went wrong. I made my usual size but it was far too large (I know that the top is supposed to be a relaxed fit and that’s what I loved about it, but this is so relaxed that it slips off my shoulders), the fabric doesn’t have the right drape for the pattern (I feel a sturdier fabric would work better), the neckline just doesn’t sit right and the arms are far, far too wide (again, a fit issue).

I want to try again with this pattern as I think that when it works, it works well. But, in this instance, it hasn’t worked. I thought it might be fixable and it isn’t the worst fit by any means, so I put it on this morning, determined to like it. But, as we speak, it is again slipping off my shoulders and the baggy arms are annoying me. So, back to the drawing board with this one.

I don’t usually make alterations to patterns, except if I want to add extra length, so I’m wondering how I’ll go about it with this one. I think I may make up a smaller version or I did consider taking out the seam allowances (which aren’t actually on the printed pattern), but I’m not sure that would work.

Perhaps my sturdier mustard fabric from Cloth House will make a better top? If you have any suggestions on what to do, please send them my way.

Thanks!

 


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Some sad By Hand London news

img_4664I’ve just read some incredibly sad news from the By Hand London girls this morning. The brand will no longer run as it has been and the girls will be moving on to other projects while working on By Hand London as a sideline.

This is a huge blow for the sewing industry, but also understandable. I know firsthand the costs of living in London and being self-employed so I can see where they are coming from, but still, By Hand London is one of the leaders of the UK sewing industry and I will be sad to see it go.

There are a number of paper patterns still available to buy and all future patterns will be released as PDF patterns only. I really love the range of patterns from By Hand London – each one is so on-trend and I remember feeling really excited about the brand when I first discovered it. But, things change and I wish the girls well as they are all lovely. I really hope we’ll see more of By Hand London soon!